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Basketball Systems, Skills & Drills
 

Shooting
Hubie Brown movement


sketch
1
Hubie Brown

Shooter with rebounder and passer, two balls. For 30 seconds the shooter moves back and forth along the arc (12-15 shots). Each pass is to his inside shoulder, allowing him to square up by getting behind the ball, instead of catching and turning, which is too slow (Brown demonstrates with a hop pivot off his inside foot to jump behind the ball). To be a quick shooter, it's how you catch the ball.

See Shooting - Memphis zone, Memphis 3-man 2-ball, also Hubie Brown spot shooting and shooting off the dribble, and Duke windshield wiper for partner shooting.
 
goxavier.com - on the move Hubie Brown - develop on the move one-two step for balance (this footwork doesn't involve screening action). Chest pass to cutter moving toward the passer, overhead pass moving away. Banana cut going away, flip hips coming to the ball. Long strides, no baby steps. Jump over the line with great leg drive when shooting.
 
Derek Kellogg - 3-man 2-ball spot shooting - 9-minute drill, one shooter for 1 minute then rotate, move wing to corner, top of key to top of key, wing to corner on the other side. Sprint to a spot when the ball goes through the net, square up as you sprint (his players use a jump stop).
 
Hal Wissel (NBA Coaches Playbook) - as a pass is thrown, jump behind the ball while facing the basket, catch and shoot in one motion. On open shots, the passer aims for the shooter's far hand, which blocks the pass. Keep the ball high, don't lower it. When you can't catch and shoot in one motion, a shot fake allows time to adjust the hands and feet and get a shooting rhythm. Use a step and turn (pivot) only when closely guarded. Shooting rhythm comes from a down-and-up motion of the legs. When shooting off the catch, the "down" comes just before the catch, and the shot goes up as the legs go up.
 
Jeff Bauer - receivers catch with both feet in the air and jump stop facing the basket - square in the air.
 
Jerry Krause - shooting off a pass, hop from the basket-side foot to land with the feet ready to shoot from a quick stop facing the basket with dominant foot forward and hands ready, ball in shooting pocket.

sketch
2
Herb Livsey - the quality of the shot depends on the quality of the feet, catch the ball with your feet, play the game with your legs ready, knees bent (picking the ball up off the floor in practice forces you to use your legs). Always step into a shot, don't jump, the best shooters have step-up not jump-in shots. Inside pivot if you know you have a shot (catch and shoot), catch with the pivot foot already square to the basket (or now you have to square it, and the trail foot has to cover a long distance to catch up). Slow shooters have to get set, they have two problems, a) the trail foot is too far behind the pivot foot when catching to shoot, b) knees are not bent so the player has to generate power by dipping after the catch or twisting and turning upper body. Permanent pivot foot if you are attacking 1-on-1 (catch and attack), he prefers a permanent pivot foot, it simplifies the game, free up the right foot for right-handers (Scottie Pippen would reverse pivot on the left wing, put his back to the defence).
 
coachesclipboard.ca - a 1-2 or jump stop can be used to stop before going into a shot, many players use only one stop, others use both. On a 1-2 stop, catch the ball at the same time the inside foot is hitting the floor, the second foot follows quickly behind to move the player into proper shooting stance. Be low with hands up, land on the inside foot in a heel-toe action, toes point to the rim, the second foot also points toes to the rim. For a jump stop, when the ball is in the air usually jump off the inside foot and land on the balls of both feet at the same time in proper shooting stance (think ball in the air, feet in the air).
 
Mike MacKay - step into your shot on the catch, be square to the basket as the second foot hits the floor.

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